“Not all those who wander are lost.”

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Flamenco, Whatsapp & Google Translate

deur Gerard Scholtz (Rol af vir foto’s) Ana, flamenco cantaura, led us through Seville’s narrow, dark and cobbled backstreets. We were running a little late. [...]

Cordoba, die wit stad

deur Gerard Scholtz (Rol af vir foto’s) Ons het afgewyk van die Silwer Roete om ook Cordoba en Granada in te sluit. Kom so [...]

  • 'We the Youth' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    on 16 July 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Located in South Philly's Point Breeze Neighborhood, "We the Youth" is a mural created by 14 high school students (six from New York City, eight from Philadelphia) and the famous New York-based artist Keith Haring. It remains the only one of Haring's collaborative public murals still in situ, as well as the only collaborative mural by Haring that’s still intact. “We the Youth” was created in 1987 to coincide with the bicentennial of the United States Constitution, and was Haring’s only artistic endeavor in Philadelphia. The location, a rowhome in what was a low-income neighborhood facing a vacant lot, was chosen in an effort to encourage development in the neighborhood. The mural was never meant to be permanent. Thus, it has been restored multiple times, most notably in 2013, when the wall was repaired and the mural conserved in a process that took several months. The mural, which is quite typical of Haring's style, features the artist’s trademark cartoon-like figures and bright colors. It is one of nearly 4,000 murals in Philadelphia (which has been dubbed the "Mural Capital of the World") and one of the most historically significant murals in the city. However, few mainstream Philadelphia tourism websites mention it, nor do many guidebooks. […]

  • Jack's Record Cellar in San Francisco, California
    on 16 July 2019 at 4:00 pm

    While record collectors flock to Haight-Ashbury—the neighborhood that famously hosted the Summer of Love and was home to Janice Joplin, the Grateful Dead, and Jimi Hendrix—Jack’s Record Cellar is almost unknown. That's because 163 hours a week, it looks like an abandoned property, its measly “RECORDS” sign small and faded. The store opens only on Saturday from 2 to 7 p.m., and even those hours aren’t guaranteed. Most locals don't even realize it's a storefront, and its always-closed status endows it with both a touch of magic and an aura of exclusivity. But once you’re inside, Jack's is a welcoming place. It feels like a cross between an organized shop and a chaotic attic, with broken records piled in a basket, an old Eames chair hoisted atop shelves, scraps of yellowed newspaper taped to the walls, and a proprietor commenting that the music playing is “dusty.” He’s referring to the sound of aged records, but the dust in the corners of Jack’s has had time to accumulate, as its history dates back to a 1950s location on Haight Street. The shop specializes in 78s, a type of heavy but brittle record that plays a single song, and it’s easy to walk away with an armful of treasures. Plenty of records cost just a few dollars, and owner Wade Wright is happy to talk with enthusiastic novices and serious collectors. The store’s main business comes from eBay, but Wright opens once a week to interact with people and be part of the neighborhood. Even if you’ve never bought a record, after an hour of listening to Wright chat about the store’s early days, you might find yourself picking up the habit. […]

  • Haddam Shad Museum in Haddam, Connecticut
    on 16 July 2019 at 3:45 pm

    From the mid-1700s through the turn of the 20th century, shad fishing was a thriving industry along the Connecticut River. Today, relics such as the Haddam Shad Museum exist to preserve history and regale visitors with the storied past of a beloved fish. Though it’s a little off the beaten path, this nugget of maritime history is worth the detour. In 1999, Joseph Zaientz—a former dentist and current shad enthusiast—transformed what was once “Maynard’s Shad Shack” into a museum of the same subject matter.  The Haddam Shad Museum refers to itself as “the only museum in the United States dedicated to the preservation of shad fishing history in the Connecticut River Valley.” Inside, the American shad swims through the currents of United States history, including the legend of a miraculous surge at Valley Forge that fed George Washington’s soldiers. (Though this story is well-known enough that it led to the shad's nickname of “the founding fish,” there are no official records of shad reaching the area at the time.)  Bill Maynard, who ran the now-defunct Maynard’s Shad Shack, was a local fisherman in the 1930s and 1940s. His knives, used to debone the fish, as well as his old cash register, are proudly displayed at the museum. You’ll even find a fish sculpture carved using the museum director’s broken dental tools, made by one of his patients. Though the industry’s heyday has come to an end, each spring, shad journey from the Atlantic Ocean to spawn in New England’s rivers. The “shad run” remains celebrated, and in Connecticut—where the American shad is the official state fish—the towns of Windsor, Essex, and Saybrook even host annual festivals. During this season, and this season alone, the Haddam Shad Museum opens to the public every Sunday.&nbs […]

  • Rufino Tamayo Museum of Pre-Hispanic Art in Oaxaca, Mexico
    on 16 July 2019 at 3:00 pm

    In the center of Oaxaca stands a grand but rather shabby stone building—but don't be fooled by the drab appearance, as within its walls is a veritable treasure trove of ancient archeological artifacts collected by the famous Mexican artist Rufino Tamayo. Tamayo was born in the city of Oaxaca in 1899, but moved to Mexico City to live with an aunt after the death of his parents. Despite being an orphan and growing up in poverty he showed a great interest in the arts, and went on to study fine art at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas.  Although Tamayo was a modernist artist he was fascinated by Mexico's indigenous civilizations and their enduring presence in the country's collective conscious, and he sought to portray this connection to the past in his artwork. Rather like his contemporary Diego Riviera, Tamayo used the fortune he earned from the sale of his art to obsessively collect pre-Hispanic artifacts, which served as a potent and endless source of artistic inspiration.  In the late 1970s, the enormous collection that Tamayo had assembled throughout his life began to occupy every available space of his house in Mexico City, and so it was moved to a building he had constructed in his birthplace of Oaxaca. This he opened as an ethnographic museum dedicated to the exhibition of pre-Hispanic archeology and celebrating the ancient roots of Mexican artistic expression. Inside the museum's galleries, displayed against richly colored backgrounds reminiscent of Tamayo's canvases, are artifacts ranging from well-known Mesoamerican civilizations like the Mayans, Aztecs, and Olmecs, as well as those native to Oaxaca, such as the Zapotecs and Mixtec. There are also displays of fascinating ancient sculptures unearthed from the ruins of sites associated with the more obscure cultures of western and northern Mexico, such as the Capacha, Chinesca, and Purepecha.  Since the museum's inauguration, the collection has been an important albeit often underappreciated and under-explored feature of Oaxaca. It is a must-see for any curious traveler with an interest in pre-Hispanic history, the art of Rufino Tamayo, and art history in general. &nbs […]

  • To Protest a Feared Extradition Bill, Hongkongers Turn to Mooncakes
    by Claire Voon on 16 July 2019 at 2:32 pm

    Mooncakes are edible works of art. Traditionally, the top crust of the dense Chinese pastries are decorated with geometric patterns or auspicious messages, such as the characters for “harmony” or “longevity.” Usually baked during the Mid-Autumn Festival, people send the sweet cakes to relatives and friends as a gesture of respect. So to find one that declares “Fuck you!” is, well, unheard of. One bakery in Hong Kong, however, is selling expletive-covered mooncakes like hotcakes. Wah Yee Tang Cake Shop, a family business that turns 35 this year, recently put them on its menu, along with several other fiery options. Patrons can pick up handmade treats stamped with messages such as “No withdrawal, no dismissal" (不撤不散), “Hongkonger” (香港人), and “Freedom hi” (自由西). Aside from being beautiful (and no doubt, tasty), they are meant to inspire protestors fighting a controversial extradition bill. While Hong Kong is semi-autonomous, the bill would allow for the transfer of suspected criminals there to face trial in mainland China. Not only would this undermine Hong Kong’s legal independence, but it could also lead to a surge in politically motivated prosecutions. Although Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam announced the bill dead as of last week, it has not yet been formally withdrawn. Massive demonstrations have drawn millions to Hong Kong’s streets, even as clashes with police turned violent. Wah Yee Tang hadn’t originally set out to participate in the ongoing protests, explains marketing director Naomi Suen. But the mooncakes became an enticing way to contribute to the political discourse. “We didn’t make these mooncakes on purpose to join the fight,” says the 33-year-old, who runs the store with her mother. “We made them for fun to share with friends.” But then pictures of the mooncakes made the rounds on Facebook. Now, Suen says, they’ve “become a hit.” Last Monday, Suen decided to add the anti-extradition mooncakes to the bakery’s regular offerings of traditional buns, sugarless cookies, and chiffon cakes. They have sold out every day of the week, and Wah Yee Tang is working to fulfill thousands of orders. A portion of the proceeds go to a fund that supports protestors. So far, the “No withdrawal, no dismissal” mooncake, made with red bean paste with egg yolk, is the bestseller, with its message that if the bill is not withdrawn, then the protestors will not disperse. Patrons can also choose from 11 other messages available in six flavors. “We are together and support each other” (一齊撐) is for those craving a paste of green tea and red bean. “Filibuster” (鬥長命) offers a taste of the traditional five-nuts Chinese filling. Other phrases are more tongue-in-cheek, such as “Totally irrelevant, totally insane” (九唔搭八), which is how Hong Kong singer Kenny Bee described protestors. When a policeman yelled “Reporter, my ass” (記你老母) at a reporter covering the demonstrations, the phrase became a rallying cry (especially since journalists have faced violence from the Hong Kong police). Now, it decorates a white lotus seed paste cake. “We want to make this design to show our respect to journalists,” Suen says. The spunky mooncakes shouldn’t surprise Wah Yee Tang’s regulars. When the bakery isn’t putting out traditional Cantonese pastries, it’s making special occasion cookies, from bunny-shaped treats to Hello Kitty-inspired ones. The more adult-oriented desserts actually debuted last year as playful novelties, when Suen sold cookies of impudent cats pointing their middle fingers, adorned with notes such as “Fuck you, HAHA.” “We noticed many Hongkongese are very stressed and disappointed with the overall situation of the city,” Suen says of that initial batch—amuse-bouches for the later protest cakes. She now offers mooncakes decorated with the same cat, accompanied with the character 屌, or “fuck.” With these candid cakes, Wah Yee Tang joins a small history of activists who use the mooncake as a medium. In 2012, the artist Wilson Shieh designed mooncakes to raise legal funds for protestors convicted of unlawful assembly after a vigil marking the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre turned violent. Sold at a Shanghai art gallery, the cakes read, “Anti-rent increase” and “Fight the landlords.” Two years later, participants of the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong made mooncakes that read “Occupy Central” (佔領中環), the name of the pro-democracy campaign that launched four months of street sit-ins in pursuit of free elections. Perhaps these activists were paying homage to an ancient folktale. One story goes that mooncakes helped the Chinese overthrow the ruling Mongols during the Yuan Dynasty. A military counsel known as Liu Bowen rallied men to use mooncakes to hide slips of paper calling for rebellion. The organization led to a successful uprising, resulting in the establishment of the Ming Dynasty in the 14th century. Being less covert, Wah Yee Tang’s bold mooncakes have already drawn criticism. As the South China Morning Post reports, pro-police Hongkongers have called for a boycott of the bakery, arguing that “the products here will lead youngsters astray.” But Suen isn’t backing down. The bakery will only stop producing protest pastries when mooncake season is over—that is, when the Mid-Autumn Festival ends in September. Until then, churlish cats and encouraging cakes will fly off the shelves—fuel, in a way, for a still-burning fire. […]

  • The Little Falls in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
    on 16 July 2019 at 2:00 pm

    In between a highway on-ramp and the Sheraton Suites is a beautiful section of the Cuyahoga River. There, a waterfall known as "The Little Falls" and the surrounding gorge are often overlooked by residents and visitors. The Little Falls and Big Falls, one mile south in Gorge Metro park, are important to the health of the Cuyahoga River. Like many rivers in industrial areas, dams were installed in the early 1900s to control flooding and to power factories and mills. As a result, the waterfalls disappeared beneath human-made barriers. In 2013, two dams with 35 feet of concrete were removed from this section of river. Other dams in cities downstream were demolished, creating natural whitewater rapids and revealing the Little Falls. Today, this section of river has attracted professional whitewater kayakers who test their skills against the might of the Cuyahoga. An annual kayak race features the Class III waterfall "Little Falls," Class II rapids, and a Class V rapid. Wildlife has returned to the same river that caught fire 50 years earlier including muskrat, mink, otter, and numerous native fish species. […]

  • 'Terris Novalis' in Consett, England
    on 16 July 2019 at 1:00 pm

    Built on the site of the oldest commercial railway line in Britain—the Stanhope and Tyne Railway Line—this sculpture marks the location of what was once Europe's largest steelworks. The sculptures are 20 times the size of the tools they represent. The stainless steel theodolite and engineer's level stand on the top of a small hill and are visible for miles around. The sculptures of these 19th-century instruments are a monument to the history and industry of the local area. The enormous sculptures were created by Tony Cragg. Take a good look at the bottom of the instruments, and you'll notice they're held up by a peculiar set of "feet"—a human hand, a horse hoof, a bird foot, and a reptilian foot. It's said these feet were inspired by the symbolic heraldry of shields and coats of arms associated with the local land and its ownership. The views out toward the distant moors are also worth the visit. […]

  • How best to explore Lake Malawi
    by Getaway on 16 July 2019 at 12:32 pm

    Getaway's deputy editor, Catherine Hofmeyr, explains why Lake Malawi is one of Africa's best waterways. The post How best to explore Lake Malawi appeared first on Getaway Magazine. […]

  • Virtual reality travel to help elderly
    by Gabrielle Jacobs on 16 July 2019 at 12:30 pm

    Active senior citizens in Japan's hyper-aged society can use their agency to travel, and using VR technology, can help their less mobile peers. The post Virtual reality travel to help elderly appeared first on Getaway Magazine. […]

  • Duboce Bikeway Mural in San Francisco, California
    on 16 July 2019 at 12:00 pm

    Are you hoping to bike around San Francisco without sweating your way up its infamous hills? It can be done—if you know where to go. And more often than not, that means passing by a mural so long it takes a full 30 seconds to bike by.  The 400-foot mural, known as the Duboce Parkway Mural, depicts a bike journey through the entire city, from downtown by the Bay to the sand dunes of Ocean Beach. Volunteer artists working with the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition created the painted scene to celebrate the parkway, the city’s first stretch of road to be transformed by removing car traffic. Some of the fanciful flourishes include an anthropomorphized Transamerica Pyramid (previously the city’s tallest skyscraper); flying machines that represent the area's inventive, entrepreneurial zeal; and a giant raccoon (a regular sight on late-night rides). You may also notice a curving streambed, which you won't actually find burbling its way past Victorians, at least in this century. A creek did once run through what is now the Haight, and cyclists bike its former path every day. This route is known as the Wiggle, and its zig-zagging trajectory takes cyclists from Market Street and the site of the mural up to the Haight neighborhood and Golden Gate Park—all while bypassing the steepest inclines. It's a beloved feature of the bike-friendly city, making the pathway that serves as a gateway to the Wiggle worthy of a world-class mural. […]

  • 'We the Youth' in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    on 16 July 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Located in South Philly's Point Breeze Neighborhood, "We the Youth" is a mural created by 14 high school students (six from New York City, eight from Philadelphia) and the famous New York-based artist Keith Haring. It remains the only one of Haring's collaborative public murals still in situ, as well as the only collaborative mural by Haring that’s still intact. “We the Youth” was created in 1987 to coincide with the bicentennial of the United States Constitution, and was Haring’s only artistic endeavor in Philadelphia. The location, a rowhome in what was a low-income neighborhood facing a vacant lot, was chosen in an effort to encourage development in the neighborhood. The mural was never meant to be permanent. Thus, it has been restored multiple times, most notably in 2013, when the wall was repaired and the mural conserved in a process that took several months. The mural, which is quite typical of Haring's style, features the artist’s trademark cartoon-like figures and bright colors. It is one of nearly 4,000 murals in Philadelphia (which has been dubbed the "Mural Capital of the World") and one of the most historically significant murals in the city. However, few mainstream Philadelphia tourism websites mention it, nor do many guidebooks. […]

  • Jack's Record Cellar in San Francisco, California
    on 16 July 2019 at 4:00 pm

    While record collectors flock to Haight-Ashbury—the neighborhood that famously hosted the Summer of Love and was home to Janice Joplin, the Grateful Dead, and Jimi Hendrix—Jack’s Record Cellar is almost unknown. That's because 163 hours a week, it looks like an abandoned property, its measly “RECORDS” sign small and faded. The store opens only on Saturday from 2 to 7 p.m., and even those hours aren’t guaranteed. Most locals don't even realize it's a storefront, and its always-closed status endows it with both a touch of magic and an aura of exclusivity. But once you’re inside, Jack's is a welcoming place. It feels like a cross between an organized shop and a chaotic attic, with broken records piled in a basket, an old Eames chair hoisted atop shelves, scraps of yellowed newspaper taped to the walls, and a proprietor commenting that the music playing is “dusty.” He’s referring to the sound of aged records, but the dust in the corners of Jack’s has had time to accumulate, as its history dates back to a 1950s location on Haight Street. The shop specializes in 78s, a type of heavy but brittle record that plays a single song, and it’s easy to walk away with an armful of treasures. Plenty of records cost just a few dollars, and owner Wade Wright is happy to talk with enthusiastic novices and serious collectors. The store’s main business comes from eBay, but Wright opens once a week to interact with people and be part of the neighborhood. Even if you’ve never bought a record, after an hour of listening to Wright chat about the store’s early days, you might find yourself picking up the habit. […]

  • Haddam Shad Museum in Haddam, Connecticut
    on 16 July 2019 at 3:45 pm

    From the mid-1700s through the turn of the 20th century, shad fishing was a thriving industry along the Connecticut River. Today, relics such as the Haddam Shad Museum exist to preserve history and regale visitors with the storied past of a beloved fish. Though it’s a little off the beaten path, this nugget of maritime history is worth the detour. In 1999, Joseph Zaientz—a former dentist and current shad enthusiast—transformed what was once “Maynard’s Shad Shack” into a museum of the same subject matter.  The Haddam Shad Museum refers to itself as “the only museum in the United States dedicated to the preservation of shad fishing history in the Connecticut River Valley.” Inside, the American shad swims through the currents of United States history, including the legend of a miraculous surge at Valley Forge that fed George Washington’s soldiers. (Though this story is well-known enough that it led to the shad's nickname of “the founding fish,” there are no official records of shad reaching the area at the time.)  Bill Maynard, who ran the now-defunct Maynard’s Shad Shack, was a local fisherman in the 1930s and 1940s. His knives, used to debone the fish, as well as his old cash register, are proudly displayed at the museum. You’ll even find a fish sculpture carved using the museum director’s broken dental tools, made by one of his patients. Though the industry’s heyday has come to an end, each spring, shad journey from the Atlantic Ocean to spawn in New England’s rivers. The “shad run” remains celebrated, and in Connecticut—where the American shad is the official state fish—the towns of Windsor, Essex, and Saybrook even host annual festivals. During this season, and this season alone, the Haddam Shad Museum opens to the public every Sunday.&nbs […]

  • Rufino Tamayo Museum of Pre-Hispanic Art in Oaxaca, Mexico
    on 16 July 2019 at 3:00 pm

    In the center of Oaxaca stands a grand but rather shabby stone building—but don't be fooled by the drab appearance, as within its walls is a veritable treasure trove of ancient archeological artifacts collected by the famous Mexican artist Rufino Tamayo. Tamayo was born in the city of Oaxaca in 1899, but moved to Mexico City to live with an aunt after the death of his parents. Despite being an orphan and growing up in poverty he showed a great interest in the arts, and went on to study fine art at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plasticas.  Although Tamayo was a modernist artist he was fascinated by Mexico's indigenous civilizations and their enduring presence in the country's collective conscious, and he sought to portray this connection to the past in his artwork. Rather like his contemporary Diego Riviera, Tamayo used the fortune he earned from the sale of his art to obsessively collect pre-Hispanic artifacts, which served as a potent and endless source of artistic inspiration.  In the late 1970s, the enormous collection that Tamayo had assembled throughout his life began to occupy every available space of his house in Mexico City, and so it was moved to a building he had constructed in his birthplace of Oaxaca. This he opened as an ethnographic museum dedicated to the exhibition of pre-Hispanic archeology and celebrating the ancient roots of Mexican artistic expression. Inside the museum's galleries, displayed against richly colored backgrounds reminiscent of Tamayo's canvases, are artifacts ranging from well-known Mesoamerican civilizations like the Mayans, Aztecs, and Olmecs, as well as those native to Oaxaca, such as the Zapotecs and Mixtec. There are also displays of fascinating ancient sculptures unearthed from the ruins of sites associated with the more obscure cultures of western and northern Mexico, such as the Capacha, Chinesca, and Purepecha.  Since the museum's inauguration, the collection has been an important albeit often underappreciated and under-explored feature of Oaxaca. It is a must-see for any curious traveler with an interest in pre-Hispanic history, the art of Rufino Tamayo, and art history in general. &nbs […]

  • To Protest a Feared Extradition Bill, Hongkongers Turn to Mooncakes
    by Claire Voon on 16 July 2019 at 2:32 pm

    Mooncakes are edible works of art. Traditionally, the top crust of the dense Chinese pastries are decorated with geometric patterns or auspicious messages, such as the characters for “harmony” or “longevity.” Usually baked during the Mid-Autumn Festival, people send the sweet cakes to relatives and friends as a gesture of respect. So to find one that declares “Fuck you!” is, well, unheard of. One bakery in Hong Kong, however, is selling expletive-covered mooncakes like hotcakes. Wah Yee Tang Cake Shop, a family business that turns 35 this year, recently put them on its menu, along with several other fiery options. Patrons can pick up handmade treats stamped with messages such as “No withdrawal, no dismissal" (不撤不散), “Hongkonger” (香港人), and “Freedom hi” (自由西). Aside from being beautiful (and no doubt, tasty), they are meant to inspire protestors fighting a controversial extradition bill. While Hong Kong is semi-autonomous, the bill would allow for the transfer of suspected criminals there to face trial in mainland China. Not only would this undermine Hong Kong’s legal independence, but it could also lead to a surge in politically motivated prosecutions. Although Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam announced the bill dead as of last week, it has not yet been formally withdrawn. Massive demonstrations have drawn millions to Hong Kong’s streets, even as clashes with police turned violent. Wah Yee Tang hadn’t originally set out to participate in the ongoing protests, explains marketing director Naomi Suen. But the mooncakes became an enticing way to contribute to the political discourse. “We didn’t make these mooncakes on purpose to join the fight,” says the 33-year-old, who runs the store with her mother. “We made them for fun to share with friends.” But then pictures of the mooncakes made the rounds on Facebook. Now, Suen says, they’ve “become a hit.” Last Monday, Suen decided to add the anti-extradition mooncakes to the bakery’s regular offerings of traditional buns, sugarless cookies, and chiffon cakes. They have sold out every day of the week, and Wah Yee Tang is working to fulfill thousands of orders. A portion of the proceeds go to a fund that supports protestors. So far, the “No withdrawal, no dismissal” mooncake, made with red bean paste with egg yolk, is the bestseller, with its message that if the bill is not withdrawn, then the protestors will not disperse. Patrons can also choose from 11 other messages available in six flavors. “We are together and support each other” (一齊撐) is for those craving a paste of green tea and red bean. “Filibuster” (鬥長命) offers a taste of the traditional five-nuts Chinese filling. Other phrases are more tongue-in-cheek, such as “Totally irrelevant, totally insane” (九唔搭八), which is how Hong Kong singer Kenny Bee described protestors. When a policeman yelled “Reporter, my ass” (記你老母) at a reporter covering the demonstrations, the phrase became a rallying cry (especially since journalists have faced violence from the Hong Kong police). Now, it decorates a white lotus seed paste cake. “We want to make this design to show our respect to journalists,” Suen says. The spunky mooncakes shouldn’t surprise Wah Yee Tang’s regulars. When the bakery isn’t putting out traditional Cantonese pastries, it’s making special occasion cookies, from bunny-shaped treats to Hello Kitty-inspired ones. The more adult-oriented desserts actually debuted last year as playful novelties, when Suen sold cookies of impudent cats pointing their middle fingers, adorned with notes such as “Fuck you, HAHA.” “We noticed many Hongkongese are very stressed and disappointed with the overall situation of the city,” Suen says of that initial batch—amuse-bouches for the later protest cakes. She now offers mooncakes decorated with the same cat, accompanied with the character 屌, or “fuck.” With these candid cakes, Wah Yee Tang joins a small history of activists who use the mooncake as a medium. In 2012, the artist Wilson Shieh designed mooncakes to raise legal funds for protestors convicted of unlawful assembly after a vigil marking the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre turned violent. Sold at a Shanghai art gallery, the cakes read, “Anti-rent increase” and “Fight the landlords.” Two years later, participants of the Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong made mooncakes that read “Occupy Central” (佔領中環), the name of the pro-democracy campaign that launched four months of street sit-ins in pursuit of free elections. Perhaps these activists were paying homage to an ancient folktale. One story goes that mooncakes helped the Chinese overthrow the ruling Mongols during the Yuan Dynasty. A military counsel known as Liu Bowen rallied men to use mooncakes to hide slips of paper calling for rebellion. The organization led to a successful uprising, resulting in the establishment of the Ming Dynasty in the 14th century. Being less covert, Wah Yee Tang’s bold mooncakes have already drawn criticism. As the South China Morning Post reports, pro-police Hongkongers have called for a boycott of the bakery, arguing that “the products here will lead youngsters astray.” But Suen isn’t backing down. The bakery will only stop producing protest pastries when mooncake season is over—that is, when the Mid-Autumn Festival ends in September. Until then, churlish cats and encouraging cakes will fly off the shelves—fuel, in a way, for a still-burning fire. […]

  • The Little Falls in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
    on 16 July 2019 at 2:00 pm

    In between a highway on-ramp and the Sheraton Suites is a beautiful section of the Cuyahoga River. There, a waterfall known as "The Little Falls" and the surrounding gorge are often overlooked by residents and visitors. The Little Falls and Big Falls, one mile south in Gorge Metro park, are important to the health of the Cuyahoga River. Like many rivers in industrial areas, dams were installed in the early 1900s to control flooding and to power factories and mills. As a result, the waterfalls disappeared beneath human-made barriers. In 2013, two dams with 35 feet of concrete were removed from this section of river. Other dams in cities downstream were demolished, creating natural whitewater rapids and revealing the Little Falls. Today, this section of river has attracted professional whitewater kayakers who test their skills against the might of the Cuyahoga. An annual kayak race features the Class III waterfall "Little Falls," Class II rapids, and a Class V rapid. Wildlife has returned to the same river that caught fire 50 years earlier including muskrat, mink, otter, and numerous native fish species. […]

  • 'Terris Novalis' in Consett, England
    on 16 July 2019 at 1:00 pm

    Built on the site of the oldest commercial railway line in Britain—the Stanhope and Tyne Railway Line—this sculpture marks the location of what was once Europe's largest steelworks. The sculptures are 20 times the size of the tools they represent. The stainless steel theodolite and engineer's level stand on the top of a small hill and are visible for miles around. The sculptures of these 19th-century instruments are a monument to the history and industry of the local area. The enormous sculptures were created by Tony Cragg. Take a good look at the bottom of the instruments, and you'll notice they're held up by a peculiar set of "feet"—a human hand, a horse hoof, a bird foot, and a reptilian foot. It's said these feet were inspired by the symbolic heraldry of shields and coats of arms associated with the local land and its ownership. The views out toward the distant moors are also worth the visit. […]

  • How best to explore Lake Malawi
    by Getaway on 16 July 2019 at 12:32 pm

    Getaway's deputy editor, Catherine Hofmeyr, explains why Lake Malawi is one of Africa's best waterways. The post How best to explore Lake Malawi appeared first on Getaway Magazine. […]

  • Virtual reality travel to help elderly
    by Gabrielle Jacobs on 16 July 2019 at 12:30 pm

    Active senior citizens in Japan's hyper-aged society can use their agency to travel, and using VR technology, can help their less mobile peers. The post Virtual reality travel to help elderly appeared first on Getaway Magazine. […]

  • Duboce Bikeway Mural in San Francisco, California
    on 16 July 2019 at 12:00 pm

    Are you hoping to bike around San Francisco without sweating your way up its infamous hills? It can be done—if you know where to go. And more often than not, that means passing by a mural so long it takes a full 30 seconds to bike by.  The 400-foot mural, known as the Duboce Parkway Mural, depicts a bike journey through the entire city, from downtown by the Bay to the sand dunes of Ocean Beach. Volunteer artists working with the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition created the painted scene to celebrate the parkway, the city’s first stretch of road to be transformed by removing car traffic. Some of the fanciful flourishes include an anthropomorphized Transamerica Pyramid (previously the city’s tallest skyscraper); flying machines that represent the area's inventive, entrepreneurial zeal; and a giant raccoon (a regular sight on late-night rides). You may also notice a curving streambed, which you won't actually find burbling its way past Victorians, at least in this century. A creek did once run through what is now the Haight, and cyclists bike its former path every day. This route is known as the Wiggle, and its zig-zagging trajectory takes cyclists from Market Street and the site of the mural up to the Haight neighborhood and Golden Gate Park—all while bypassing the steepest inclines. It's a beloved feature of the bike-friendly city, making the pathway that serves as a gateway to the Wiggle worthy of a world-class mural. […]